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February 21, 2020

For 2019 You Will Not Have to report Vitural Currency held in an Offshore Account on Form 114 - This Rule May Change in the Future

For this year the FinCEN has stated: “Currently the FBAR (Form 114) regulations do not define virtual currency held in an offshore account as a type of reportable account. For this reason, at this time, virtual currency held in an offshore account is not reportable on the FBAR.” 
However for the future you need to follow this issue since the FINCEN position on virtual currency accounts is very likely to change at some point.
You can find FinCEN’s letter of January 22, 2020 in Appendix III of the Government Accountability Office report Virtual Currencies: Additional Information Reporting and Clarified Guidance Could Improve Tax Compliance .
We can help you with your Form 114 fiing, questions and other international and expat tax questions.  Email us at ddnelson@gmail.com and go to our website at www.taxmeless.com 

February 4, 2020

Your Heirs Will be Liable to FBAR Penalties if You Do Not Resolve filing FBARS and the penalties While you Are Alive

If you do not file your Form 114 (FBAR) reporting your foreign bank and financial accounts, you can be penalized severely and so can your heirs after your death.

Read case law below about the penalty for failure to file FBARS passing on to the taxpayer heirs:

In United States v. Schoenfeld (M.D. Fla. 3:16-cv-1248-J-34PDB), by order dated 9/25/18, here, the Court held (p. 37) that the "the Court finds that the Government's claim did not abate upon Steven Schoenfeld's death."  The reasoning for the holding is found at pp. 24-36.  The first 24 pages include a short one-page introduction and then 23 pages disposing of procedural issues arising from the death of the person putatively liable that the Government sued after he had died but without knowledge of his death.  

In this case the Court holds that  that the FBAR civil willful penalty survives death.  The Court does a good job of developing and resolving the issue

There are procedures available that may let you file Form 114 (FBAR form) while you are still alive and avoid or reduce penalties.  Don't leave this burden to your heirs. Email us for help at ddnelson@gmail.com  and read more on our website at www.taxmeless.com.  We are an expert on this issue.


Criminal Penalites Imposed for Faiing to FIle Tax Returns as an Expatriate or Taxpayer. - How to avoid this problem


A taxpayer that willfully attempts to evade paying income taxes is subject to criminal and civil penalties. The type of fraud will determine the applicable penalty. The following are some examples of possible punishments for specific types of tax fraud. Remember a delinquent taxpayer expat or nonresident, can never be certain if the IRS will not view their actions as beyond negligent but intentional fraud. Therefore, file your past due returns before the IRS finds you first.  Filing yourself before being caught is viewed as indicative of no criminal intent.
  • Attempt to evade or defeat paying taxes: Upon conviction, the taxpayer is guilty of a felony and is subject to other penalties allowed by law, in addition to (1) imprisonment for no more than 5 years, (2) a fine of not more than $250,000 for individuals or $500,000 for corporations, or (3) both penalties, plus the cost of prosecution.
  • Fraud and false statements: Upon conviction, the taxpayer is guilty of a felony and is subject to (1) imprisonment for no more than 3 years, (2) a fine of not more than $250,000 for individuals or $500,000 for corporations, or (3) both penalties, plus the cost of prosecution .
  • Willful failure to file a return, supply information, or pay tax at the time or times required by law. This includes the failure to pay estimated tax or a final tax, and the failure to make a return, keep records, or supply information. Upon conviction, the taxpayer is guilty of a misdemeanor and is subject to other penalties allowed by law, in addition to (1) imprisonment for no more than 1 year, (2) a fine of not more than $100,000 for individuals or $200,000 for corporations, or (3) both penalties, plus the cost of prosecution .
     Information you give your CPA and tax preparers  is not privileged and cannot be protected from the IRS or other law enforcement agencies. When you use a Attorney you get the benefit of "attorney/client" privilege and information you give your attorney is protect from the IRS and law enforcement.  If you feel you might have criminal tax problems, best to talk first with an attorney.

Get Legal Help with Your Income Tax Problems avoid these criminal consequences.  We are CPAs and attorneys with over 35 years experience with US international, expatriate and nonresident taxation. We can solve your tax  problems before it becomes necessary to hire a criminal attorney.  Email us at ddnelson@gmail.com  and visit our website at www.taxmeless.com